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Journal Articles Geophysical Research Letters Year : 2022

Locating the largest event observed on Mars with multi‐orbit surface waves

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M. Panning
W. Banerdt
C. Beghein
S. Ceylan
D. Giardini
J. Li
S. Stähler

Abstract

Prior to the 2018 landing of the InSight mission, the InSight science team proposed locating marsquakes using multiple orbit surface waves, independent of seismic velocity models, for events larger than MW4.6. The S1222a MW4.7 of May 4, 2022 is the largest marsquake recorded and the first large enough for this method. Group arrivals of the first three orbits of Rayleigh waves are determined to derive the group velocity, epicentral distance, and origin time. The mean distance of 36.9   0.3 degrees agrees with the Marsquake Service (MQS) distance based on body wave measurements of 37.0   1.6 degrees. The origin time from surface waves is systematically later than the MQS origin time by 20 seconds. Backazimuth estimation is similar to body wave estimations from MQS although suggesting a shift to the south. Backazimuth estimates from R2 and R3 are more scattered, but do show clear elliptical motion.
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Dates and versions

hal-03918320 , version 1 (02-01-2023)

Identifiers

Cite

M. Panning, W. Banerdt, C. Beghein, S. Carrasco, S. Ceylan, et al.. Locating the largest event observed on Mars with multi‐orbit surface waves. Geophysical Research Letters, 2022, ⟨10.1029/2022GL101270⟩. ⟨hal-03918320⟩
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