Skip to Main content Skip to Navigation
Journal articles

Accuracy of Smart Scales on Weight and Body Composition: Observational Study

Abstract : Background Smart scales are increasingly used at home by patients to monitor their body weight and body composition, but scale accuracy has not often been documented. Objective The goal of the research was to determine the accuracy of 3 commercially available smart scales for weight and body composition compared with dual x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) as the gold standard. Methods We designed a cross-sectional study in consecutive patients evaluated for DEXA in a physiology unit in a tertiary hospital in France. There were no exclusion criteria except patient declining to participate. Patients were weighed with one smart scale immediately after DEXA. Three scales were compared (scale 1: Body Partner [Téfal], scale 2: DietPack [Terraillon], and scale 3: Body Cardio [Nokia Withings]). We determined absolute error between the gold standard values obtained from DEXA and the smart scales for body mass, fat mass, and lean mass. Results The sample for analysis included 53, 52, and 48 patients for each of the 3 tested smart scales, respectively. The median absolute error for body weight was 0.3 kg (interquartile range [IQR] –0.1, 0.7), 0 kg (IQR –0.4, 0.3), and 0.25 kg (IQR –0.10, 0.52), respectively. For fat mass, absolute errors were –2.2 kg (IQR –5.8, 1.3), –4.4 kg (IQR –6.6, 0), and –3.7 kg (IQR –8.0, 0.28), respectively. For muscular mass, absolute errors were –2.2 kg (IQR –5.8, 1.3), –4.4 kg (IQR –6.6, 0), and –3.65 kg (IQR –8.03, 0.28), respectively. Factors associated with fat mass measurement error were weight for scales 1 and 2 (P=.03 and P<.001, respectively), BMI for scales 1 and 2 (P=.034 and P<.001, respectively), body fat for scale 1 (P<.001), and muscular and bone mass for scale 2 (P<.001 for both). Factors associated with muscular mass error were weight and BMI for scale 1 (P<.001 and P=.004, respectively), body fat for scales 1 and 2 (P<.001 for both), and muscular and bone mass for scale 2 (P<.001 and P=.002, respectively). Conclusions Smart scales are not accurate for body composition and should not replace DEXA in patient care. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03803098; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03803098
Document type :
Journal articles
Complete list of metadata

https://hal-univ-paris.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-03236235
Contributor : Equipe Hal Paris Diderot <>
Submitted on : Wednesday, May 26, 2021 - 10:50:30 AM
Last modification on : Friday, June 11, 2021 - 8:38:03 AM
Long-term archiving on: : Friday, August 27, 2021 - 6:48:31 PM

File

document.pdf
Publisher files allowed on an open archive

Licence


Distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

Identifiers

Citation

Justine Frija-Masson, Jimmy Mullaert, Emmanuelle Vidal-Petiot, Nathalie Pons-Kerjean, Martin Flamant, et al.. Accuracy of Smart Scales on Weight and Body Composition: Observational Study. JMIR mHealth and uHealth, JMIR Publications, 2021, 9 (4), pp.e22487. ⟨10.2196/22487⟩. ⟨hal-03236235⟩

Share

Metrics

Record views

34

Files downloads

87